Miro has changed the way we work. It seemed logical to convert our much-loved Project Canvas template from 2015 into an open-source board and share a short Tiny Lesson on how we use it.

Jon Aizlewood
Jon Aizlewood
3rd September 2020

What's a project canvas?

Being able to concisely articulate the purpose, audience, vision and goals of a project is crucial. Yet it’s harder than it sounds. Other well-known canvasses can feel too large and grandiose, or far too granular. This project canvas — like Goldilocks’ porridge — is just right. It provides key information that is summative, visible and, crucially, relational. Through open dialogue and collaboration, the canvas helps to create a shared understanding around the brief and goals of the project, aligns the entire team, exposes unknowns and assumptions and provides a strategic purpose to the project at hand.

Project Canvas Miro board
Our Project Canvas Miro board

When should I use it?

A project canvas is a great kick-off exercise, as a collaborative and remote workshop. The canvas highlights and makes visible the relationships, dependencies and intentions that are often intangible or muddy at the start of many projects.

However, the canvas shouldn’t be used once and thrown away. Using a Miro board makes it revisitable at any time. Ideally, the canvas should be updated as and when needed, with new project intel, stakeholders or if the scope changes.

Sounds good. So how do I start?

There is no linear method for using the project canvas. It is laid out in three separate altitudes that provide varying levels of strategic detail, and four pillars that address the purpose, audience, vision and goals for your project. You might want to start with the ‘known knowns’ such as the audience, stakeholders and team. Or you might want to start large and uncover the proposition and vision. It’s entirely up to you.

Here are some tips to get the most out of your project canvas:

  • Involve the widest team possible - get your team and stakeholders involved.
  • Look to uncover and unpack assumptions.
  • Use as a way to create alignment and reduce opacity, build a shared understanding.
  • Treat it as a summative, high-level view of your project at hand.
  • Show the meaning and intentions behind the project, it helps provide the bedrock for a successful outcome.

To learn more read our original blog post on canvassing a project.

Start using the Miro board here