I’m not a big fan of job titles. I’ve always had trouble defining what I do as a noun—I much prefer verbs (“I make websites” sounds fine, but “website maker” sounds kind of weird).

Jeremy Keith
Jeremy Keith
24th March 2017

Mind you, the real issue is not finding the right words to describe what I do, but rather figuring out just what the heck it is that I actually do in the first place.

According to the Clearleft website, I'm a technical director. That doesn't really say anything about what I do. To be honest, I tend to describe my work these days in terms of what I don't do: I don't tend to write a lot of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript on client projects (although I keep my hand in with internal projects, and of course, personal projects).

Instead, I try to make sure that the people doing the actual coding—Mark, Graham, and Danielle—are happy and have everything they need to get on with their work. From outside, it might look like my role is managerial, but I see it as the complete opposite. They're not in service to me; I'm in service to them. If they're not happy, I'm not doing my job.

There's another aspect to this role of technical director, and it's similar to the role of a creative director. Just as a creative director is responsible for the overall direction and quality of designs being produced, I have an oversight over the quality of front-end output. I don't want to be a bottleneck in the process though, and to be honest, most of the time I don't do much checking on the details of what's being produced because I completely trust Mark, Graham, and Danielle to produce top quality code.

But I feel I should be doing more. Again, it's not that I want to be a bottleneck where everything needs my approval before it gets delivered, but I hope that I could help improve everyone's output.

Now the obvious way to do this is with code reviews. I do it a bit, but not nearly as much as I should. And even when I do, I always feel it's a bit late to be spotting any issues. After all, the code has already been written. Also, who am I to try to review the code produced by people who are demonstrably better at coding than I am?

Instead I think it will be more useful for me to stick my oar in before a line of code has been written; to sit down with someone and talk through how they're going to approach solving a particular problem, creating a particular pattern, or implementing a particular user story.

I suppose it's really not that different to rubber ducking. Having someone to talk out loud with about potential solutions can be really valuable in my experience.

So I'm going to start doing more code previews. I think it will also incentivise me to do more code reviews—being involved in the initial discussion of a solution means I'm going to want to see the final result.

But I don't think this should just apply to front-end code. I'd also like to exercise this role as technical director with the designers on a project.

All too often, decisions are made in the design phase that prove problematic in development. It usually works out okay, but it often means revisiting the designs in light of some technical considerations. I'd like to catch those issues sooner. That means sticking my nose in much earlier in the process, talking through what the designers are planning to do, and keeping an eye out for any potential issues.

So, as technical director, I won't be giving feedback like "the colour's not working for me" or "not sure about those type choices" (I'll leave that to the creative director), but instead I can ask questions like "how will this work without hover?" or "what happens when the user does this?" as well as pointing out solutions that might be tricky or time-consuming to implement from a technical perspective.

What I want to avoid is the swoop'n'poop, when someone seagulls in after something has been designed or built and points out all the problems. The earlier in the process any potential issues can be spotted, the better.

And I think that's my job.

This was originally posted on my own site.